Kim Bouvy

14-26 september 2012: Tourist Information Rotterdam-Istanbul

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Stadium, Kasımpaşa - Kim Bouvy 2012

Tourist Information Rotterdam-Istanbul

In Rotterdam a temporary tourist information centre for Istanbul is created. Photographers Kim Bouvy and Hans Wilschut offer their vision of the highly populated city of Istanbul. The enormous changes that have swept through Istanbul are also visible in its urban planning. For Tourist Information Istanbul, they visited both the city’s famous and lesser-known locations, like the modernistic city hall and the residential area Bosporus City. The Istanbul bureau SO? Architecture & ideas has devised a unique presentation with the work of the photographers and designers. Tourist Information temporarily becomes the fictitious centre of a city in another city.

In 2012 The Netherlands and Turkey are celebrating 400 years of diplomatic relations. By the manifestation Tourist Information, both cities are presented in a new way, as ‘promotion’ through the eyes of artists and with the works of architects. They are literally put on the map in another city, where the photographers and architects are challenged to present an image of the city, responding to existing campaigns with personal and artistic reflections. The artists are challenged to explore their artistic view to create a new and alternative ‘campaign’, exploring the sense of the city with their own means.

Tourist Information Rotterdam-Istanbul is a project initiated and produced by Perplekcity, Pieter Kuster and Emine Yilmazgil, a collective for urban programming.

Photographers: Kim Bouvy, Hans Wilschut, Ali Taptik and Serkan Taycan

Architects: SO? Architecture and Ideas, 2012 Architecten

Tourist Information Istanbul in Rotterdam
Westblaak 86
Open Tue-Sun 13-18h
14-26 september 2012
http://www.rotterdamistanbul.com

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Installation shots ‘Taksim Square’, - Kim Bouvy 2012
(double channel slide installation, 154 35 mm slides)

24 June - 2 September 2012: Exhibition ‘Learning from…Rotterdam’

Exhibition ‘Learning from Rotterdam’ - Kunsthalle Wilhelmshaven (DE)
24 June - 2 September 2012
With Elian Somers (NL), Kim Bouvy (NL), Oliver Gudow (DE) and Jost Wischnewski (DE)
Curated by Viola Weigel (dir. Kunsthalle Wilhelmshaven)

New works I made during a short stay in the North German town of Wilhelmshaven on invitation by the Kunsthalle Wilhelmshaven will be shown, together with the installation ‘Phantom City’.

Around July 10, the second number of the magazine ‘KW’ will be published which will feature our works and texts about Rotterdam and Wilhelmshaven by ao Viola Weigel and Caroline von Courten.

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‘Lena’ - c-print on aluminum, 75 x 95 cm

The exhibition takes a certain assumed analogy between the two harbor cities of Wilhelmshaven and Rotterdam as starting point: both were damaged during the Second World War (Wilhelmshaven also during WW I), both cities are closely tied to their harbor and therefore ’sacrificed’ for a greater cause in different moments in history to serve a purpose that goes beyond its own economical and social borders.
A new phase for Wilhelmshaven will commence soon: In August 2012, the JadeWeserPort will be opened: a new and Germany’s only deep water container port located at the German Bight on the North East side of Wilhelmshaven. The other deep water port in Western Europe is…Rotterdam. The realization of the JDW port is in a sense connecting the two cities and harbors - not the least as competitors. Not only looking at Rotterdam in an economical sense, but also learning from Rotterdam in a social and cultural sense might be valuable, is what (the curator of) this exhibition is implying.

The title of the exhibition also refers to the seminal publication ‘Learning from Las Vegas’ by Scott Brown, Venturi and Izenour (revised ed. 1977) which, indirectly, formed my starting point when photographing the city of Wilhelmshaven.
There, I was not looking so much for similarities between the two cities, but tried to grasp the vernacular specificity of this seemingly anonymous urban fabric in the North of Germany.

http://www.kunsthalle-wilhelmshaven.de

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‘Stoever’ - c-print on aluminum, 75 x 95 cm

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‘Bayram Markt’ - c-print on aluminum, 75 x 95 cm

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‘International’ - c-print on aluminum, 75 x 95 cm

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Installation shots Kunsthalle Wilhelmshaven

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slide installation ‘Phanton City’, Kunsthalle Wilhelmshaven

Deconstruction of a Weavers’ House

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These are some images I took last April of an old weavers’ house in the small city of Assendelft in Noord-Holland. The house was in the process of being deconstructed, peeled as an onion, to possibly be reconstructed again at the Zaanse Schans: a peculiar time-capsule, where significant traditional wooden buildings from the area around Zaandam have been relocated to, mostly in the sixties and seventies. This collection of nomadic green wooden houses form a new constellation that has a certain Disney-like feeling about it - although different since many of the houses are inhabited by real people.

I was asked by Michiel van Iersel from Non-Fiction (how appropriate) to document the house in its ‘most original state’ at its plot of land, where a new villa would arise after the house had been deconstructed. While making the photos, construction workers were taking the house apart, bit bit by bit, some pieces were numbered, many pieces were not. The man in charge of the deconstruction, would also be building the new villa. The house would be transported into parts to a storage, where it probably still sits today.

The future will tell if this house will ever be reconstructed and presumably renovated, but to which authentic glory, I asked myself? What will be restored of the entropic but very characterstic state of the building, formed by many layers of use, before it went down? Who will decide how its real and original character will be revived?
I was fascinated by the way the layers and colors of paint had, together with the wooden skeleton of the structure, had a certain formal, abstract quality.

Photography commission Maasstad Hospital Rotterdam

About a year ago, I started working on a series of views, that would be placed in the waiting areas of a newly built hospital in Rotterdam. The Maasstad Hospital approached Gerco de Ruijter, Bas Princen and me to come up with a proposal for these spaces of transit and waiting. The series is called ‘Points of View’ and depicts remarkable points of views in the city. I wanted to simulate space in these spaces, to give the opportunity to wander off in your mind, while waiting for a treatment or doctors’ appointment. For the commission, I went to Barcelona and Valencia and added two images I took in Shanghai last summer. Now they are finally installed!

All images are 150×190 cm, mounted on dibond, framed in wooden frames with plexi glass.
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Shanghai, 2010
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Barcelona, 2011
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Barcelona, 2011
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Shanghai, 2010
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Barcelona, 2011

BOOK ‘Home’ - VMX Architects

In June 2010, the book ‘Home’ by VMX Architects was published (SUN Publishers). For this book, I photographed 16 housing projects in the Netherlands designed by VMX in the last 15 years.

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Graphic designers Mevis & van Deursen and VMX contacted me because they were looking for a different approach towards architecture photography for their book. In books about architecture, the architecture is most often photographed when still brand new, unblemished and uneffected by use and wear of its inhabitants, therefore showing quite an ‘unreal’ image of architecture. This makes sense, when one considers architecture photography to be an important marketing tool for architects to promote their works with images that pay homage.

The book is also meant to function as a study book. It includes a text by writer and journalist Marina de Vries, who is also living in one of the housing projects by VMX. The book is made out of 16 different chapters, one for each housing project, each consisting of an introduction text, the technical drawings and my images from the project taken inside and outside. The housing projects that I photographed range from building projects still in preperation, commissioned family homes, to large social housing projects.

The book was made in a very short period of time, but still resulted in a challenging book that illustrates a very fresh and open minded attitude towards what architecture and its representation is and how this could be presented in a book in a different way. An aspect that became a focus for my images, was how the inside world of the architecture of VMX and the outside world related to eachother, how inside and outside are experienced in parallel, as a kind of osmosis of the senses.

Having such an open minded architecture firm and Netherlands’ most prominent graphic designers asking me to apply a different approach, photographing their projects in their full functioning existence and giving me freedom to interpret the commission in dialogue with them, was a very exiting challenge and experience.

ISBN 9789461051295
Dutch/English edition
Paperback | 81 images in Full color

324 pages / 146 x 220 mm
€32,50

BUY THE BOOK HERE

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